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Seeds of varieties bred or reselected by Oregon plant breeder and author Carol Deppe.
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Indian Spinach-Red Aztec, Huazontyle
Our Price: €2.50

Chenopodium berlandiera This is a relative of the weed Fat Hen and quinoa, with succulent edible leaves. Also makes great baby leaf greens and microgreens. Traditionally it is the young flower heads that are eaten, battered and fried. Plant late spring to early autumn. Heirloom native American variety, sourced from Carol Deppe. Cut whole plants or cut and come again. Average 400 seeds per packet


Burgundy Amaranth
Our Price: €2.50

A tall elegant, variety with burgundy flower plumes that bear plentiful white seeds preferred for grain and flour. The leaves are an intense red and add colour and nutrition to salads. The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked. We got this from Carol Deppe. Sow April to June for grain, and anytime for leaves. Average 400 seeds per packet
Beefy Resilient Grex
Our Price: €2.50

Phaseolus vulgaris x Phaseolus acutifolius This is a segregating population of beans that represent the F4 and F5 of crosses between ‘Gaucho’ common bean X ‘Black Mitla According to Carol who bred it, "it is the most intensely beefy flavored bean I have ever eaten. Has become my main eating bean. Also the most productive dry bean I have ever grown by a factor of 2X or more. (I am adopting Alan Kapuler’s terminology and calling such a segregating population a “grex.”) ‘Gaucho’ is a very early, very delicious gold dry bean. ‘Black Mitla’ tepary is a widely adapted black tepary with a powerful delicious flavor as a dry bean. Both are small beans round in cross section and about twice as long as wide. Both are easy to thresh. Teparies are unusually drought- hardy and are resistant or tolerant to diseases common beans succumb to. Common bean varieties tend to yield more. In 2009 I was trying to do seed increases on the pure varieties, which shouldn't have crossed since they are different species. Such crosses are “against the rules.” The beans were unruly. I got about 5% crosses from patches that were 12' apart, as evidenced by about 5% black beans in the 2010 grow-out of what I thought was (and what looked like) pure (gold-seeded) ‘Gaucho’. I couldn’t think of any cross that has more potential for producing interesting and highly resilient dry bean varieties than this cross, though, however unintended. So I hand-sorted out several thousand black seeds representing those crosses and planted them in 2011 to produce Resilient Bean Breeder F3. These turned out to be the most productive dry beans I have ever seen. When I cooked up a pot of the mixed colors, the flavor blew me away. It tastes more beefy than beef does.

The plants are short-vined in type, and hold their pods up off the ground so can be handled like a bush type. To harvest I clip or pull plants and roll up the tangled row-shaped mat of beans. About 3⁄4 of the beans are black; the rest are brown, tan, gold, or speckled. Maturity is a little later than ‘Gaucho’ but still quite early. (Presumably there will be continuing segregation for plant type, maturity, drought resistance, disease resistance, and bean color and flavor.) I am selecting gently for earliness (by eliminating any plants that are not dry along with the main crop) but not selecting otherwise. Save seed from the plants that do best for you and breed your own unique varieties adapted to your own needs and conditions. Or just use as a mix, as I am. This should be particularly good material from which to select varieties for short-seasons, cool or cold or hot summer weather, drought hardiness, yield, and disease resistance. (Note: This is essentially the same material I sold last year as ‘Resilient Bean Breeder F3’. It has now earned a name and permenent place in my garden.) To cook Beefy Resilients I soak for 24 hours with adequate stirs and occasional water changes; soaking time is variable, but they all swell completely in that time. Cooking time is uniform, about 45 minutes." Average 30 seeds per packet

In our garden at Brown Envelope Seeds, which suffered from extraordinary amounts of rain in 2012 and was pretty dry in 2013, this bean outperformed all others in both years. It has not been selected any further, except for survival. Average 30 seeds per packet.

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This is an Open Source Seed Initiative Pledged variety. You are buying full rights to this seed rather than just renting it for a season. You have the right to use this seed however you want, breed with it, or even grow and sell the seed yourself. When you buy or accept this variety, however, you are agreeing to honor the OSSI Pledge.

Open Source Seed Initiative Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, licenses or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.

You can honor the commitment to include the Pledge with all transfers of the seeds by giving the information in your seed catalog or on your seed packets or by a written letter or e-mail communication or by accompanying the seeds with a flier like this one. (Feel free to copy and use this flier when you swap, give away, or sell OSSI-Pledged seeds.)

For information on how to join the Open Source Seed Initiative movement as an individual member, a plant breeder, or a Partner Seed Company, and for a list of OSSI-Pledged varieties and OSSI Partner Seed Companies, visit http://osseeds.org/. Join in the fight to protect and expand the rights of gardeners and farmers everywhere to save, breed, swap, and sell seeds

Cascade Ruby Gold
Our Price: €2.50

Best short season corn we have tried so far. It even made a crop in 2012. The variety was bred by Carol Deppe, in Oregon. She describes it as THE ULTIMATE SURVIVAL CROP. It can be used for cornbread, johnny cakes, and polenta. It produces solid-colored ears of several colors—red, red-brown, dark red, orange-gold, maple-gold, gold, and yellow. Interior kernel color is always yellow or gold. Each color of ear produces a different flavor of cornbread. The red shades make a rich-flavored cornbread; the yellow shades make a mild-flavored cornbread. Both make great polenta and johnny cakes. Recipes for cornbread, johnny cakes, and polenta made with this corn can be found in The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-reliance in Uncertain Times.
Average 50 seeds per packet
pastedGraphic.pdf

This is an Open Source Seed Initiative Pledged variety. You are buying full rights to this seed rather than just renting it for a season. You have the right to use this seed however you want, breed with it, or even grow and sell the seed yourself. When you buy or accept this variety, however, you are agreeing to honor the OSSI Pledge.

Open Source Seed Initiative Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, licenses or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.

You can honor the commitment to include the Pledge with all transfers of the seeds by giving the information in your seed catalog or on your seed packets or by a written letter or e-mail communication or by accompanying the seeds with a flier like this one. (Feel free to copy and use this flier when you swap, give away, or sell OSSI-Pledged seeds.)

For information on how to join the Open Source Seed Initiative movement as an individual member, a plant breeder, or a Partner Seed Company, and for a list of OSSI-Pledged varieties and OSSI Partner Seed Companies, visit http://osseeds.org/. Join in the fight to protect and expand the rights of gardeners and farmers everywhere to save, breed, swap, and sell seeds!

Gaucho
Our Price: €2.50

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Phaseolus vulgaris Gaucho is an Argentinian heirloom dry bean which we got from Carol Deppe and which came to her from the Abundant lIfe Seed Foundation. It is a very early and productive bean for drying. It did reasonably well in 2015. Average 30 seeds per packet.
   
 
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